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​​Primate Resources for Researchers

National Primate Research Centers

The National Primate Research Centers (NPRCs) provide facilities, animals and expertise for investigators using nonhuman primates for biomedical research. In FY 2014, the NPRCs facilitated more than 1,000 individual research projects involving approximately 2000 researchers. The NPRCs support research in all areas of biomedicine, including infectious disease, neurobiology, metabolic disease,reproductive biology, aging and many others. The majority of researchers that use the NPRC physical and intellectual infrastructure are funded by the U.S. Public Health Service, including most of the NIH categorical institutes and Centers. The NPRCs also support researchers funded by non-PHS governmental sources such as the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, as well as researchers funded by foundations and the private sector.  To facilitate these studies, in fiscal year 2014, the NPRCs housed approximately 23,000 monkeys representing 13 different species.  Approximately 21,000 of these animals are macaque monkeys.

The newly launched NPRC Research and Capabilities Website (http://nprcresearch.org/) provides investigators, collaborators and program managers with a comprehensive resource to facilitate innovative research with nonhuman primates. Detailed information is provided regarding specific areas of research, support capabilities, and publications for each NPRC.  ORIP strongly encourages consultation with any of these Centers to discuss particular areas of interest. For additional information please also see Center Access Criteria and Procedures

FUNDING OPPORTUNITY ANNOUNCEMENT PAR-14-226 : Limited Competition: National Primate Research Centers (P51)

Monkey Research Resources

Chimpanzee Research Resources
Chimpanzee Management Program

Specific-Pathogen-Free Macaque Resources

Nonhuman Primate Research Reagents

 


 

Center Access Criteria and Procedures

The National Primate Research Center (NPRC) facilities and resources enable NPRC staff scientists and investigators from the host institution and others across the country to collaborate on their research projects. The centers' specialized resources are intended to support investigators who receive their primary research project funding from NIH, but they also may be used by investigators who are funded by other federal, state, and local agencies, as well as by research foundations and the private sector.

Each NPRC has a Visiting Scientist Program that offers advanced training and research in nonhuman primate biology. Collaborative arrangements between investigators and center scientific staff are encouraged and can be developed on studies related to major human diseases, subject to the availability of resources. Nonhuman primate blood samples, organs, and biological fluids are available through the NPRCs. The following standardized criteria and procedures have been implemented at each NPRC to facilitate utilization of center resources:

Access Criteria
  • The nature and scope of the proposed research must be best conducted with nonhuman primates and be compatible with available center resources.
  • The proposed research must have high scientific merit as determined by peer review.
  • NIH–funded research takes precedence over research activities funded by other sources.
  • Grants must contain appropriate budgets for the NPRC portion, including animal per diem costs.
  • Availability of NPRC resources, including animals, space, research services and support, and special requirements—such as biosafety facilities— are also limiting factors that must be considered by the investigator.
  • Because of potential contamination (e.g., viral, microbial), movement of animals into or out of the NPRC facilities is not allowed. Thus, the proposed research using live animals must use NPRC animals, and the research must be conducted at the NPRC.
Access Procedures
  • An initial research proposal must be submitted by the researcher to the NPRC prior to submitting an application for funding. The director then consults with the research services, veterinary, and colony management staff members at the center to assess resource availability and project feasibility.
  • When resource availability and project feasibility have been established, the NPRC staff will provide budget information to the researcher regarding the center costs to be included in the formal research proposal.
  • The scientific merit of the proposal must then be evaluated through the NIH peer review process or through a similar process at other agencies. However, small pilot projects with other funding sources may be considered. In the latter case, the peer review is conducted by the NPRC Research Advisory Committee.
  • In addition to the scientific peer review, a protocol approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees (IACUC) at both the investigator's institution and the NPRC must be in place. Protocols must also be established to address biosafety concerns.
  • When the investigator has received notification of funding, the NPRC director should be advised immediately so that the resources at the center may be reserved for the funded proposal.
  • Biological materials such as blood samples, organ tissues, and biological fluids can be obtained by contacting the directors and staff of the NPRCs.

All publications resulting from research conducted at or with NPRC resources must bear an appropriate acknowledgment of ORIP support.

Inquiries

For additional information about the Visiting Scientist Program and resources available at a specific center, including applying to utilize a center's resources, contact the center director or appropriate contact person listed in this directory.

 

 

 


 

California National Primate Research Center
Research Emphasis/Objectives

The California National Primate Research Center (NPRC) is a research unit of the University of California, Davis. The mission of the CNPRC is to improve human health and quality of life through support of exceptional nonhuman primate research programs.

Current Research

The center has a diverse program of research utilizing nonhuman primates. Research projects encompass many aspects of biology and medicine, including AIDS and other infectious diseases; reproductive issues such as those associated with conception, pregnancy, and fetal growth and development; neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease; nutritional deficiencies; pulmonary disorders such as asthma, emphysema, and other chronic obstructive lung diseases; xenotransplantation; cell- and gene-based therapies; acute and chronic stress; temperament and biobehavioral organization; social relationships; neurobiology; cognitive function; and behavioral development.

Services Provided

Research units include brain, mind, and behavior; reproductive sciences and regenerative medicine; respiratory diseases; and virology and immunology; as well as an affiliate research program, core services, and the primate services and medicine division. Research opportunities are available for investigators from national and international institutions, as well as scientists within the UC Davis research community. The NPRC is also home to the Center for Fetal Monkey Gene Transfer for Heart, Lung, and Blood Diseases under the direction of Alice Tarantal, Ph.D.

To Outside Investigators

Specimens

Organs and tissues are provided when available; other biological samples are provided on special request. Shipping, collecting, and processing costs are charged to the requestor.

To Collaborating Scientists

Scientists wishing to conduct research at the center must have their projects reviewed and approved by the center director, research advisory committee, and campus animal care review committee. The center's services are available to collaborating scientists on a fee-for-service basis. Services include:

Core Services

Behavior Management Services Core
Endocrine Core
Immunology and Pathogen Detection Resources Core
Inhalation Exposure Core
Multimodal Imaging Core

Contact Core Leaders at http://www.cnprc.ucdavis.edu/our-services/core-services/

Primate Medicine

Preventive medicine and epidemiologic evaluation, surgery, radiology, therapeutics, specialized medical procedures.

Diagnostic Pathology and Clinical Laboratory Services

Bacteriology, biochemistry, hematology, parasitology,pathology, virology.

Animals

Center breeding colony: rhesus macaque ( M.mulatta). Center research colony: Callicebus cupreus, M. mulatta

Contact Information

California National Primate Research Center
University of California, Davis
Davis, CA 95616

Website: www.cnprc.ucdavis.edu

Grant No: P51 OD011107

Center Director and Contact
Peter A. Barry, Ph.D.
Phone: 530-752-0420; Fax: 530-754-6228
E-mail: pabarry@ucdavis.edu

Additional Contacts
Jennifer Short
Assistant Director, Colony Mgmt. and Research Services
Phone: 530-752-7169
E-mail: jjshort@primate.ucdavis.edu

Jeffrey A. Roberts, D.V.M.
Associate Director for Primate Services
Phone: 530-752-6490
E-mail: jaroberts@ucdavis.edu

Principal Investigator
Harris A. Lewin, Ph.D.
UC Davis Vice Chancellor for Research

 The center is located on a 300-acre tract three miles from the main campus of the University of California, Davis. The university administers the center and provides its academic setting.

 

 


 

Oregon National Primate Research Center
Research Emphasis/Objectives

The Oregon National Primate Research Center (ONPRC) is engaged in a spectrum of studies based in the scientific research divisions of Diabetes, Obesity & Metabolism, Neuroscience, Pathobiology & Immunology, and Reproductive & Developmental Sciences. This research is complimented by interdisciplinary programs in the areas of addiction, childhood health, healthy aging and primate genetics. Collaborative research that is initiated by external investigators is managed through the Collaborative Research Unit (CRU).

Current Research
  • Diabetes, Obesity, & Metabolism: Diet-induced maternal obesity, metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance, adipose biology and islet function.
  • Neuroscience: Research on fundamental and integrative mechanisms underlying nervous system dysfunctions and resultant disease states using the major scientific disciplines of neuroendocrinology, neurodevelopment, neurodegeneration, addiction, aging, and primate genetics.  Specific technologies are produced and utilized, including novel methods to acquire in vivo imaging data, measure cognitive performance, introduce and assess genetic therapeutics, provide functional neuroanatomical links to behavior, and identify informative phenotypes for genetic analysis of traits.
  • Pathobiology & Immunology: Cellular and molecular events controlling pathogenesis and immune responses of clinically important infectious agents (HIV/SIV, herpes family viruses, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, yellow fever virus, Dengue, Chikungunya virus), novel vaccine development, and research in basic primate immunology, immune senescence and bioterrorism.
  • Reproductive & Developmental Sciences:  Regulation of neuroendocrine, gonadal, reproductive tract and gamete function as related to advancing our understanding of reproductive physiology, the diagnosis and treatment of infertility, the creation of novel contraceptives, as well as defining the genetic and epigenetic parameters necessary for normal growth and development.

Other key scientific programs:

  • Healthy Aging: Dietary modulation of age-related changes in immune function, circadian physiology, and learning and memory, efficacy of endocrine therapies for postmenopausal declines in cognition and emotional health.
  • Early Childhood Health and Development;
  • Primate Genetics;

Animal Colony

Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), ~4,200; Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata), ~350; cynomolgus macaques, ~100; Baboons (Papio anubis), relatively few. Specialized animal resources: Obese resource (Japanese and rhesus macaque models of diet-induced obesity); Aging resource (aged rhesus macaque cohort); Primate Genetics Program (colony ancestry, pedigree genetics, demographics and biostatistics); Behavioral Sciences Unit; Timed Mated Breeding Program; Infectious Disease Resource; Japanese macaque resource; Infant Lab; and an ABSL-3 animal research facility. Colony care and maintenance are the responsibility of the Division of Comparative Medicine, which includes 15 full-time veterinarians and ~110 support staff.

Services Provided

To Outside Investigators

Tissue specimens, organs, etc., as available from Pathology Services tissue procurement program. Costs are assumed by the requestor.

To Collaborating Scientists

Scientists wishing to conduct research at the ONPRC must have their projects approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee, the Institutional Biosafety Committee, and the Research Advisory Committee (RAC). The RAC does not typically evaluate proposals that undergo formal peer review by national review panels (i.e., NIH, DOD, etc.). Investigators interested in collaborative work who do not have an existing relationship with an ONPRC investigator should direct enquiries to the CRU, which is headed by the Associate Director for Research (contact information below). Collaborators have access to ONPRC research support cores, which are listed below. Most services are provided on a fee-for-service basis.

Pathology Services tissue procurement program

Necropsies, tissue distribution, consultation.

Imaging and Morphology

Confocal and laser-capture microscopy and stereology, tissue embedding and sectioning, immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization.

Endocrine Technology Services

Steroid and protein hormone Luminex, ELISAs, IRMAs, and RIAs, assay development.

Molecular and Cellular Biology

DNA synthesis and sequencing, cDNA probes, real-time PCR, maintenance of cell lines, media preparation, lentivirus design and preparation.

Assisted Reproductive Technologies

Procedures related to in vitro fertilization, nuclear transfer, intracytoplasmic sperm injection, culture media, gamete preservation.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging

3T Siemens magnet, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, MRI training.

Flow Cytometry

Flow cell analysis and sorting.

Molecular Virology

Virus identification, production, and quantification, reagent and standardized assay development.

Library

6,400 books, 10,150 bound journals, 70 journal subscriptions, 2,000 online journals, 113 databases, ILL and reference services.

Contact Information

Oregon National Primate Research Center
Oregon Health & Science University
505 N.W. 185th Avenue
Beaverton, OR 97006

Website: onprc.ohsu.edu

Grant No.: P51 OD011092

Center Director and Contact
Nancy L. Haigwood, Ph.D.
Phone: 503-690-5500; Fax: 503-690-5569
E-mail: HaigwooN@ohsu.edu

Associate Director for Research
Charles Roberts, Ph.D.
Phone: 503-690-5259; Fax: 503-690-5569
E-mail: RobertsC@ohsu.edu

Principal Investigator
Joseph Robertson, M.D.
President, Oregon Health & Science University
Portland, OR 97239

The center is located on a 166-acre campus, 12 miles from downtown Portland. OHSU provides its academic setting.

 

 

 


 

Southwest National Primate Research Center
Research Emphasis/Objectives

The Southwest National Primate Research Center (SNPRC) supports studies of nonhuman primate models of human diseases, including common chronic diseases and infectious diseases, and the effects that genetics and the environment have on physiological processes and susceptibility to specific diseases.

Current Research

Chronic Diseases

Genetic and environmental bases for susceptibility to atherosclerosis, hypertension, osteoporosis, obesity, and cancer; construction of baboon and rhesus gene maps; genome scans for disease-related genes; therapeutic monoclonal antibodies; development of new genetic analysis strategies and software.

Infectious Diseases and Biodefense

AIDS; hepatitis B, C, and E; herpes B and other herpes viruses; Chagas disease; hemorrhagic fevers; emerging viral diseases; vaccine and drug development and testing.

Development and Aging

Contraception; nutrient restriction or obesity in pregnancy and developmental programming; ingestive behavior; brain imaging; gene and stem cell therapies

Services Provided

To Outside Investigators

The SNPRC encourages the use of its resources by investigators from the national and international biomedical research communities. The SNPRC is also available for collaborative research initiatives involving center staff and outside investigators. In general, expenses are assumed by the initiating investigator, and collaborative research efforts are covered by grants acquired collaboratively.

Specimens

Banked serum, tissue, and DNA samples; fresh blood, serum, plasma, tissues, and organs.

Animals

Baboons, (Papiohamadryasanubis, P.h. cynocephalus), chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), common marmosets (Callithrixjacchus), miscellaneous primate species as required for specific research purposes. Also, rhesus macaques with an LDL receptor defect that causes familial hypercholesterolemia.

Veterinary Technical Services

Timed pregnancies, tether, radiography, sonography, endoscopy, experimental surgery, experimental diets, nursery, behavioral assessment. ABSL-3 and ABSL-4 laboratories are available for infectious disease research, including research with Select Agents.

Pathology Services

Necropsies, clinical chemistry, hematology, histology, bacteriology, virology, parasitology.

Immunology Services

Flow cytometry, cytokine and hormone Luminex assays, ELISA, ELISPOT, viral screening, cell separation.

Data Services

Colony database system, genetic analysis software, genetic typing services.

Contact Information

Texas Biomedical Research Institute
Southwest National Primate Research Center
P. O. Box 760549
San Antonio, TX 78245-0549

Website: http://www.txbiomed.org/primate-research-center

Grant No.: P51 OD011133

Center Director and Contact:
Robert E. Lanford, Ph.D.
Phone: 210-258-9445
E-mail: rlanford@txbiomed.org

Principal Investigator
Robert W. Gracy, Ph.D.

The center is located on the 200-acre campus of the Texas Biomedical Research Institute, approximately 12 miles from downtown San Antonio and 7 miles from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. Texas Biomed administers the center.

 

 

 


 

Tulane National Primate Research Center
Research Emphasis/Objectives

The Tulane National Primate Research Center is heavily focused on infectious disease research and also has a significant program in gene therapy/regenerative medicine that capitalizes on a unique colony of macaques with Krabbe disease.

Current Research

The major areas of infectious disease research at the Center are currently AIDS, Lyme disease, Tuberculosis and biodefense-related agents. The AIDS-related research is quite diverse, covering pathogenesis, vaccine development, microbicides, and the origins of AIDS. These are multidisciplinary studies involving investigators in several Divisions at the TNPRC and collaborators outside the Center. Common to these studies is a focus on disease pathogenesis and on using such findings to inform the development of vaccines, diagnostics and therapeutics. The regenerative medicine program involves both traditional viral-vector-mediated gene transfer as well as nonhuman primate mesenchymal and embryonic stem cells. For more information, visit: www.tnprc.tulane.edu

Services Provided

To Outside Investigators

Specimens: Tissue specimens, blood, and other bodily fluids are provided when available. Collection, processing, and shipping costs are normally assumed by the requestor.

To Collaborating Scientists

The TNPRC provides highly integrated clinical and laboratory support for studies using nonhuman primates. This includes a full-time staff of clinical veterinarians and technicians and core services commonly used for infectious disease and gene therapy research including: 1) Diagnostic Parasitology; 2) Vector-Borne Diseases (maintains arthropods that are important for the study of vector-borne diseases); 3) DNA Microarray and Gene Expression; 4) Anatomic Pathology; 5) Clinical Pathology; 6) Molecular Pathology; 7) Confocal Microscopy and Image Analysis; 8) Flow Cytometry; 9) Cellular Immunology; 10) Virus Characterization, Isolation, and Production; 11) Pathogen Detection and Quantification; 12) Infectious Disease Aerobiology; 13) Genetics and Genome Banking; 14) Vector Development and Production; and 15) Nonhuman Primate Stem Cell Production. For more information, visit www.tnprc.tulane.edu/research_resou.html .

Animals

Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) of both Indian and Chinese origin are available. Other species can be obtained. Most of the rhesus macaques are specific-pathogen free (B virus, SIV, SRV, and STLV1 negative).

Contact Information

Tulane National Primate Research Center
18703 Three Rivers Road
Covington, LA 70433

Website: www.tnprc.tulane.edu

Grant No.: P51 OD011104

Center Director and Contact
Andrew A. Lackner, D.V.M., Ph.D., Dipl. A.C.V.P.
Phone: 985-871-6201; Fax: 985-871-6569
E-mail: tnprc@tulane.edu

Additional Contact
Rudolf P. Bohm, Jr., D.V.M., Dipl. A.C.V.P.
Phone: 985-871-6362
E-mail: TNPRC-VetMed@tulane.edu

Principal Investigator
L. Lee Hamm, M.D.

The Center is part of the Tulane University Health Sciences along with the School of Medicine and School of Public Health & Tropical Medicine and is located on 500 acres near Covington, Louisiana, 35 miles from the main campus.

 

 

 


 

Washington National Primate Research Center
Research Emphasis/Objectives

The Center’s mission is to support outstanding biomedical research directed towards significant human health issues and nonhuman primate health and biology.

The Center’s program emphasizes integration of research support, animal care and administrative activities to meet the needs of the nonhuman primate (NHP) research community. The Center’s scientists conduct a wide variety of fundamental andtranslational research protocols, investigate NHP biology and disease, support a broad affiliate scientist program, develop innovative technologies, and provide training to the scientific community and public.

Current Research

Scientists conduct basic and translational research supported by highly experienced support staff and withaccess to a variety of dedicated facilities required for NHP research protocols. The Center’s research divisions are described below:

AIDS-Related Diseases

Providing expertise and resources to better understand, prevent and treat HIV and AIDS.Scientists provide contributions to AIDS research including characterization of the virus-host interaction, restriction factors, immune response, and development of new vaccines and therapeutics.

Nonhuman Primate Systems Biology

Using high-throughput molecular profiling, statistical analysis and computational modeling to understand infection, pathogenesis, and immunology.

Global Programs

Focusing on conservation biology, field study training and international outreach activities. Areas of focus include NHP population status, genetic characterization, habitat viability, population management, disease risk and sustainability modeling.

Neuroscience

Using the NHP model to answer questions about the nervous system, vision and more. Current research includes applications of gene therapy toward color vision research, exploration of treatments for spinal cord injuries and paralysis using electronic neurochips, andtreatments for balance disorders using implanted devices.

Reproductive & Developmental Sciences

Exploring reproductive biology and cognitive development in NHPs. The division includes a new core service providing macaque embryonic stem cells.

Evolutionary Emergence of Infectious Diseases

Understanding how interspecies interaction leads to the emergence of disease.

Venture/Pilot Program

Providing specialized facilities, expertise and support to investigators with approved projects.

Services Provided

Affiliate Scientists/Outside Investigators

The Center is committed to providing complete access to resources for the research community to facilitate all aspects of nonhuman primate-related research. The Center provides substantial assistance for collaborative research projects, including scientific and technical assistance with protocol development, grant submission, data collection and interpretation, and manuscript preparation.

Primate Resource Referral Service (PRRS)

The Primate Resource Referral Service (PRRS) provides the communications/database network needed for efficient acquisition and sharing of existing captive NHPs and primate-related resources by investigators and institutions both nationally and internationally. The overall goal of this service is to maximize the use of existing captive primates, thereby reducing the total number of NHPs needed for research, and in turn, helping to promote the conservation of primate populations.

Comparative Pathology Services (CPS)

CPS provides sophisticated comparative pathology services to Center veterinarians, core scientists, UW researchers, and affiliate and outside investigators. The CPS pathologists also have adjunct faculty appointments in the UW Department of Comparative Medicine (DCM), and interact with pathologists and laboratory animal veterinarians of the DCM. With ancillary support and consultation provided by DCM pathologists together with their technicians and laboratories, WaNPRC and DCM pathologists provide an extent of expertise which neither entity could alone support. The CPS also provides a training resource for students enrolled in the DCM post-DVM training programs of laboratory animal medicine and anatomic pathology.

Tissue Distribution Program

The Tissue Distribution Program provides NHP tissue samples to a broad variety of biomedical scientists. This program is an NPRC leader in distribution of biologic samples to both academic and commercial biomedical researchers. Staff continue to modify tissue extraction, preservation, and shipping techniques to meet research needs and extend the use of this valuable NHP resource.

Colony Services

Services include NHP health care, surgical procedures, imaging facilities, genetic characterization, clinical laboratory, round-the-clock nursery care, computerized genealogic and clinical records using the Animal Research Management System (ARMS), psychological well-being, preventive medicine, and consultation.

Biostructure Technology Laboratory

Services include the following:

  • The Neurohistology Section is equipped and staffed to assist researchers in the production of brain sections suitable for microscopic analysis and whole specimens for high-resolution MRI.
  • The Microscopy/Image Processing Section is a shared instrument facility that provides semi-automatic acquisition, analysis and storage of images, both microscopic and macroscopic, for anatomical aspects of neurobehavioral studies at the WaNPRC and remote institutions via the Web.
  • BrainInfo/NeuroMaps (http://braininfo.org ) is an international web-based informatics resource that provides neuroscientists immediate access to detailed information about classical brain structures of the human, macaque, rat and mouse.

Bioengineering Services

Bioengineering Services provides technical support for neuroscience research using NHPs. This includes selection or design of equipment forexperiments, fabrication/modification/repairof customized instrumentation, andmaking designs available to the larger NHP research community.

Infant Primate Research Laboratory (IPRL)

The IPRL provides services to investigators using infant NHPs as animal models for behavioral and biological research. The IPRL is supported as a core facility of both the WaNPRC and the UW Center on Human Development and Disability.The IPRL provides around-the-clock care for pregnant females and infants in order to optimize survival and minimize morbidity. This effort increases the number of healthy animals available to the overall primate colony and reduces costs to investigators.

Timed Mating Breeding Program

In this program, the Center has the ability to produce gestation-known fetuses and infants for investigators through daily menses tracking using a noninvasive observational method. This is particularly important for our current studies requiring early gestation interventions or experimental treatments that may affect gestation length.

High-Throughput Molecular Profiling Core

This lab is a resource for scientists to obtain datasets by oligonucleotide microarray, next-generation sequencing, and proteomics. The core has particular expertise in applying these methods to NHP research, and has the instrumentation, computing infrastructure, personnel, and long-term experience necessary for running large numbers of samples and working with large volumes of data.

Biosafety Level 3 (BSL-3) Facility

The BSL-3 facility uses unidirectional airflow and high efficiency particle air (HEPA) filtration to control aerosols and remove infectious organisms from the air. This enables the Center to maintain a degree of readiness to rapidly respond to a human infectious disease outbreak, a principal function of all NPRCs.

Virology/Immunology Service Core

This core provides services in the following areas: (1) Sample processing, including isolation of plasma, serum and PBMC, and processing of various tissues, e.g., lymph node, vaginal wash, etc.; (2) Lymphocyte immunophenotyping and hematology; (3) Virus isolation by coculture; (4) Viral load determination by various PCR methods; (5) Serology, including ELISA, and immunoblots assays in multiple formats; and (6) Virus stocks and viral antigens.

Primate Diagnostic Services Laboratory (PDSL)

The PDSL helps to fulfill the Center’s mission to provide healthy, research-ready NHPs for biomedical research through regular monitoring for evidence of select simian viruses. Additionally, the PDSL plays a crucial role in the Center’s colony breeding programs through timely notification of colony managers of the virus infection status of all NHPs in the breeding colonies.

Animals

Pigtailed macaque (Macacanemestrina), Cynomolgus macaque (Macacafascicularis), rhesus monkey (Macacamulatta), squirrel monkey (Simiasciureus)

Collections

A broad variety of collections are archived encompassing developmental and physiologic data for the nonhuman primate.

Contact Information

Washington National Primate Research Center
University of Washington
I-421 Health Sciences
Box 357330
Seattle, WA 98195-7330

Website: www.wanprc.org

Grant No.: P51 OD010425

Center Director and Contact
Michael J. Mustari, Ph.D.
Phone: 206-543-0440; Fax: 206-616-6771
E-mail: directorsoffice@wanprc.org

Tissue Distribution
Phone: 206-616-8122
E-mail: necropsy@wanprc.org

Principal Investigator
David M. Anderson, D.V.M
Executive Director
Health Sciences Administration

The center is located in the Warren G. Magnuson Health Sciences Center of the University of Washington and at the Western Facility Annex in Seattle.

 

 

 


 

Wisconsin National Primate Research Center
Research Emphasis/Objectives

The WNPRC's mission is to increase our understanding of basic primate biology and to improve human health and quality of life through research. To accomplish this, the WNPRC:

  • Helps discover treatments, preventions and cures for human disease.
  • Generates new knowledge of primate biology, from the molecular and whole animal levels to the understanding of primate ecosystems.
  • Facilitates research progress by providing expertise, resources and training to scientists worldwide.
  • Collects primate information and disseminates to the research community and to the public.

Quick Facts:

  • Personnel: The WNPRC has a staff of 200 that supports research by more than 520 scientists and their personnel from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the United States and around the world. More than 80 UW-Madison graduate students and post-doctoral trainees conduct research through the center each year.
  • Funding: Scientists working on more than 100 subprojects through the center annually earn awards totaling approximately $26 million – 88% in federal funding and 12% in non-federal sources.
  • Colony: 1,400 animals: 1,000 rhesus macaques, 200 common marmosets, 200 cynomolgus macaques.
Current Research

The WNPRC focuses on four strategic areas of research and a diverse affiliate program.

Global Infectious Disease (GID): Transmission and pathogenesis of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV), influenza, Dengue, viral escape, vaccine development, MHC-defined animals, influenza, and identification of new viruses with zoonotic and/or pandemic potential.

Regenerative and Reproductive Medicine (RRM): Embryonic/pluripotent stem cell biology including cellular therapies for hematologic, cardiovascular, and neurodegenerative diseases, organ transplant tolerance, stem cell-based therapies for AIDS; assisted reproductive technologies (ART) for NHP transgenesis, maternal-fetal health including pregnancy loss and poor outcomes, intrauterine environment in metabolic and reproductive epigenetic programming, endometriosis, and polycystic ovary disease.

Energy Metabolism and Chronic Disease (EMCD): Chronic disease and aging research, with an emphasis on the genetic, cellular, and whole animal effects of caloric restriction (CR), as well as excess caloric intake resulting in obesity and metabolic syndrome; diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, and new studies on post menopausal hormone changes and metabolic disease risks.

Neuroscience: Preclinical Parkinson’s disease research, translational studies of glaucoma, as well as stress, anxiety, and depression, and basic studies of central nervous system mechanisms controlling fertility, puberty, menopause, and body weight, and neuroendocrine regulation of reproductive and social behaviors.

Services Provided

To Affiliate Scientists/Outside Investigators

Researchers interested in conducting research through the WNPRC and using any of the below services or resources should first contact our Scientific Protocol Implementation (SPI) (http://www.primate.wisc.edu/wprc/services/spi.html)

SPI integrates the expertise of Research Services and Animal Services to help researchers conduct leading edge science supported by expert animal care.

Research Services and Resources:

  • Assay Services
  • Elite Controller Resource
  • Genetics
  • Immunology
  • Virology
  • Aging Resource
  • Stem Cell Resource

Animal Services:

  • Scientific Protocol Implementation
  • Behavioral Management Unit
  • Colony Management Unit
  • Compliance and Training Unit
  • Pathology Services (Tissue Distribution Program)
  • Veterinary Services Unit

To Collaborating Scientists

The center actively encourages national and international researchers to use its facilities and services and to conduct collaborative studies. Scientists wishing to conduct research must have their projects reviewed and approved by the center director and advisory committees and have independent funding to cover costs. Most of the center's services are available on a fee-for-service basis.

Contact Information

Wisconsin National Primate Research Center
1220 Capitol Court
Madison, WI 53715-1237

Website: www.primate.wisc.edu

Grant No.: P51 OD011106

Center Director and Contact
Jon Levine, Ph.D.
Phone: 608-263-3500; Fax: 608-265-2067
E-mail: levine@primate.wisc.edu

Additional Contacts
Jordana Lenon
Public Information and Outreach
Phone: 608-263-7024
E-mail: jlenon@primate.wisc.edu

Principal Investigator
Marsha R. Mailick, Ph.D.

The center has approximately 120,000 square feet of laboratory, animal, office, and related support space on and near the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus. The UW-Madison Graduate School provides the center's administrative support and academic setting.

 

 

 


 

Yerkes National Primate Research Center
Research Emphasis/Objectives

The Yerkes National Primate Research Center conducts biomedical and biobehavioral research to improve the health and well-being of human and nonhuman primates.

Current Research

Microbiology and Immunology

Advance molecular and biological processes for understanding, preventing, and treating infectious diseases; primate models for research on AIDS pathogenesis, treatment, and vaccines; and for other infectious diseases including malaria and TB.

Behavioral Neuroscience and Psychiatric Disorders

Conducts basic and translational research to understand the neurobiological mechanisms underlying behaviors relevant to developmental and psychiatric conditions such as autism spectrum disorders, anxiety-related disorders, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD).

Developmental and Cognitive Neuroscience

Examines the neurobiology of social behavior and cognition across the life span; genetic, biological, and environmental factors that regulate social behavior and cognition; how social experience affects physiological processes and brain function.

Neuropharmacology and Neurological Diseases

Focuses on neurochemistry and neuroanatomy of neurologic disease; mechanisms of drug addiction and dynamics of drug receptors; cognitive changes with aging and neurologic disease; oculomotor processing under normal and pathological conditions.

Services Provided

To Outside Investigators

Research proposals by investigators from other institutions are encouraged. Proposals should be submitted for review by the Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) to ensure that resources are available. All proposals are reviewed by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Services available to outside investigators at approved rates include veterinary medicine, pathology, and biomedical engineering.

Animals

Rhesus macaque ( Macaca mulatta ), paigtailed macaques (M. nemestrina), cynomolgus macaque (M. fascicularis), sooty mangabey (Cercocebus atys), squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus), chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

Service Cores

Brain Imaging and Radiochemistry, Molecular Pathology, Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) Virology, Genomics, Biomarkers, NIH Tetramer, Confocal Microscope, Comparative AIDS Core, Flow Sorting, Rodent Vivarium.

Contact Information

Yerkes National Primate Research Center
Emory University
954 North Gatewood Road, N.E.
Atlanta, GA 30322

Website: www.yerkes.emory.edu

Grant No.: P51 OD011132

Center Director and Contact
R. Paul Johnson, M.D.
Phone: 404-727-7707; Fax: 404-727-0623
E-mail: rpaul.johnson@emory.edu

Principal Investigator
S. Wright Caughman, M.D.

 

Center facilities include the Main Station on 25 acres of the Emory University campus in Atlanta and the 117-acre Field Station for psychobiology research in nearby Lawrenceville.

 

 

 


 

Baboon Research Resources
Research Emphasis/Objectives

The Baboon Research Resource conducts multidisciplinary studies on captive baboons and provides a resource of laboratory-born and laboratory-reared baboons for NIH-sponsored research programs. Additional objectives are to: maintain and provide available research facilities accredited by the Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care International; serve as a ready source of baboons ( Papio spp. ) of mixed ages and sex for use in biomedical and behavioral sciences; and provide professional staff necessary to support investigators' research needs.

Current Research

Current research activities involve characterizing the endogenous microorganisms of the conventional research baboon, improving methods for production of baboons in a captive environment, developing a specific-pathogen-free colony of baboons, developing vaccines, and testing genetic diversity among the baboon breeding population.

Services Provided

To Outside Investigators

The mission of the Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center (OUHSC) Baboon Research Resource is to support biomedical and behavioral research requiring the baboon as the animal model. The resource supports research investigators at the OUHSC and also serves as a national resource by supporting numerous investigators located at institutions across the United States. This resource enables NIH-funded investigators to purchase baboons for their research programs, subcontract with the resource to conduct the study on location at the OUHSC, or lease the baboons for conducting their studies and then return the baboons to the breeding colony. Together with the Oklahoma State University College of Veterinary Medicine, the Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences, and the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, the resource continues to further develop and improve the usefulness of the baboon as an animal model.

To Collaborating Scientists

Individuals interested in collaborative studies must provide a protocol to the principal investigator of the Baboon Research Resource. Approval of collaborative projects depends on the relevance of the proposed project to the objectives of the Baboon Research Resource, with preference given to NIH-funded studies. Complete animal husbandry, veterinary medical care, technical assistance, and pathology services are available to investigators who have approval from the principal investigator to use resource colony animals.

Animals

Adult, infant, and juvenile baboons are available.

Contact Information

Baboon Research Resources
University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
Division of Animal Resources
940 S. L. Young Boulevard, BMSB 203
Oklahoma City, OK 73190

Grant No.: P40 OD010988

Principal Investigator and Contact
Gary L. White, D.V.M., M.M.S.
Phone: 405-271-5185; Fax: 405-271-2660
E-mail: gary-white@ouhsc.edu

Additional Contact
Richard W. Eberle, Ph.D.
Phone: 405-744-8169; Fax: 405-744-5275
E-mail: reberle@okstate.edu

 

 

 


 

Caribbean Primate Research Center Program
Research Emphasis/Objectives

The Caribbean Primate Research Center Program (CPRC) is committed to provide to the Scientific Community, Indian-origin rhesus macaque with known background and of the same genetic pool, as well as a scientific scenario to be used in studies of numerous diseases that afflict humans, and to conduct multidisciplinary collaborative studies on the life cycle of the rhesus macaques as a biological model for humans.

Cayo Santiago

The Cayo Santiago (CS) population is the oldest free-ranging colony that is maintained under minimal human intervention and since its establishment in 1938 when 409 founders from India were released onto Cayo Santiago, the island population remains a closed colony. Replacements since the introduction of the original stock have been exclusively recruited through births. There is an extensive computerized demographic database on approximately 10,100 animals, which contains up to 11 macaque generations traced through matrilines. A genetics database contains genotypes and paternity for all monkeys born since 1990, as well as many of the older animals. It serves a platform for short- and long-term studies of social and sexual behavior, population genetics, demography, reproductive biology, psychopharmacology, functional morphological, and parasites of rhesus monkeys maintained under semi-natural conditions.

Sabana Seca Field Station

Headquarters of the CPRC, specific-pathogen-free (SPF) rhesus breeding colony and biomedical research on spontaneous diseases (arthritis, osteoporosis, adult-onset macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetes, obesity, hypertension), social behavior, endocrinology, medical genetics, vaccine development, and husbandry of Cayo Santiago-derived rhesus macaques.

Laboratory for Primate Morphology (LPM)

The collection has over 3,900 complete or nearly complete skeletons from 18 species of nonhuman primates. Of these, 2,600 skeletons are from rhesus macaques of known identities with known maternal pedigree relationships. Up to eight generations of animals are represented in the collection. The rhesus skeletal collection is from the free-ranging colony on Cayo Santiago and those from CS housed at the Sabana Seca Field Station (SSFS); date of birth, sex, maternity, group affiliation, parity (for females), and date of death are known. Paternity and full pedigrees are known for many while medical records are available on skeletons from SSFS monkeys. The LPM also has a large collection of rhesus plaster dermatoglyphics.

Virology Laboratories

Research on simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV, as a model for AIDS in rhesus monkeys) and on strategies for the development of vaccines against SIV and dengue viruses. This BL2/3 fully equipped laboratory also supports the SPF grants by performing serological testing of herpes, STLV-1, SRV, and SIV in rhesus macaques.

Translational Science Initiative at CPRC

The research activities are conducted throughout the Translational Science Initiative (TSI). The mission of TSI is to catalyze the generation of innovative models and technologies that will enhance the development, testing and implementation of diagnostics and therapeutics across a wide range of human diseases and conditions. A major strength of this TSI is conducting multidisciplinary collaborative studies to establish and to validate NHP models for preclinical translational sciences covering different humans’ diseases. The TSI emphasizes research on Dengue virus and the SIV as a model for AIDS, its pathogenesis, strategies for vaccine development, and immune-based therapeutic strategies. Models for stroke and endometriosis in rhesus are also investigated among others.

One Health Approach

The CPRC supports and promotes the One Health Initiative as a movement to promote all-inclusive collaborations between physicians, veterinarians, dentists, nurses and other scientific-health and environmentally related disciplines. Most of translational research project conducted at the CPRC are results of collaborations among researchers with different professional backgrounds. The initiative is also advocated in the protection of the environment. For its location, the CPRC is surrounded by wetland. This area of study is the natural habitat of the critically endangered Puerto Rican Plains coquí, Eleutherodactylus juanariveroi.

Services Provided:

Collaborations: CPRC welcomes collaborative research with established behavioral and biomedical investigators and encourages the use of its animal and osteological resources for dissertation research. Investigators are charged modest use fees for access to the animals, computerized database, and office space. All proposals receive rigorous peer review and are judged on scientific merit, feasibility, and potential overlap with ongoing studies. Protocols using live monkeys must be approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) of the home institution, as well as the University of Puerto Rico Medical Sciences Campus IACUC.

Specimens: Tissue specimens, organs, blood, skeletal structures, etc.

Animals: SPF and conventional rhesus monkeys available for sale for NIH Research Investigators. We are the second largest provider of conventional and SPF Indian-origin rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) for PHS sponsored research projects. The colony is derived exclusively from Indian-origin rhesus macaques; there has been no admixture with Chinese macaques and mainland long-tailed macaques as has been reported for other breeding colonies. It has a large number of founders, and inbreeding avoidance in the population has been reported.

Post mortem services: Provides direct consultation and collaboration with veterinary clinicians and research investigators. Postmortem evaluation, which includes detailed gross and histopathological examination, is performed by a board certified anatomic pathologist. It includes collection of tissue samples for bacterial and/or viral cultures, molecular diagnostics and toxicology workup if necessary. Formalin fixed and fresh frozen tissues of all vital organs are archived. Other specialized procedures such as perfusions, interpretation of specials stains, immunohistochemistry are also available.

Training: Students are welcome to apply for internships at both Cayo Santiago and SSFS. Also as part of the One Health Initiative, the CPRC also supports outreach activities. Students from local schools participate in educational activities at the Center and are educated to understand the One Health concept.

Contact Information

Mailing Address
Caribbean Primate Research Center Program
University of Puerto Rico Medical Sciences Campus
P.O. Box 1053
Sabana Seca, PR 00952-1053

Website: http://cprc.rcm.upr.edu/

Grant No.: P40 OD012217

Principal Investigator and CPRC Director
Melween I. Martinez, DVM.
Phone: 787-474-0593, Fax: 787-756-6540
E-mail: melween.martinez@upr.edu

Grant No.: U24 OD10421

Grant No.: U42 OD11128

Principal Investigator
Carlos A. Sariol, MD
Phone: 787-758-2525 ext. 5112 or ext. 1189; Fax: 787-767-1442
E-mail: carlos.sariol1@upr.edu

 

 

 

 


 

Squirrel Monkey Breeding and Research Resource
Research Emphasis/Objectives

Research objectives are to carry out multidisciplinary studies of reproduction in squirrel monkeys, to search for models relevant to human health, and to provide a resource of laboratory-born and -reared animals for NIH-sponsored research programs.

Current Research

Characterizing factors that influence captive reproduction with emphasis on developing methods to improve reproductive potential. A multidisciplinary approach—including behavioral studies, reproductive endocrinology, medical primatology, and genetics—is ongoing

Services Provided

To Outside Investigators

Tissues and body fluids are available. Such specimens are provided on a priority basis to NIH-sponsored research studies that are related to the objectives of this project. Costs of packaging and shipping are negotiated on an individual basis to be determined by the nature of the collaboration.

To Collaborating Scientists

Individuals interested in collaborative studies must provide a protocol to the principal investigator. Approval of collaborative projects depends on the relevance of the proposed project to the objectives of the ongoing research effort. Complete animal husbandry, medical care, and pathology services are available without charge to investigators who have received approval from the principal investigator to use resource colony animals.

Animals

The breeding colony currently contains approximately 450 squirrel monkeys of varying ages. Some offspring and reproductive culls are available.

Core Staff

Investigators conducting studies of medical primatology, reproductive endocrinology, data management, primate management and husbandry, primate behavioral psychology, and genetics.

Guest Investigators and Graduate Students

Guest investigators and graduate students interested in studies of factors influencing reproduction of squirrel monkeys in captivity are invited to send letters of interest. These letters will be considered based on the relevance of the applicant's interests to the ongoing research effort and the availability of resources to meet the needs of the guest investigator.

Contact Information

UT M.D. Anderson Cancer Center
Center for Neotropical Primate Research and Resources
Michale E. Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine and Research
Department of Veterinary Sciences
650 Cool Water Dr.
Bastrop, TX 78602

Website: www.kccmr.org

Principal Investigator and Contact
Christian R. Abee, D.V.M.
Phone: 512-321-3991; Fax: 512-332-7312
E-mail: cabee@mdanderson.org

 

 

 


 

Vervet Research Colony
Research Emphasis/Objectives

The colony emphasizes development of the Caribbean-origin vervet/African green monkey as a nonhuman primate model for biomedical research applications. The objectives are to provide SPF animals, husbandry information, access to the pedigreed, phenotyped, genotyped and genetically sequenced colony for research manipulations, and access to the tissue and data repository for hypothesis testing and pilot data generation.

Current Research

Current research includes development of data and tissue repositories from repeated assessments while consuming Western vs. usual laboratory chow diets, thereby providing a relevant nutritional context for studying chronic disease risk and facilitating ‘omic’ approaches to the study of females across the life span and juveniles of both sexes.

Services Provided

This resource will provide at least 85 animals per year for biomedical research, including some selected for particular traits (e.g., old age, insulin resistance, and impulsivity) or genotypes. Individuals wishing to collaborate on site can be provided with access to the colony for phenotypic or genetic assessment or for the conduct of discrete experiments. Technical support and complete anatomic and clinical pathology services are available. There is also scientific support for statistical genetic analyses.

Contact Information

Wake Forest University Primate Center
Wake Forest University School of Medicine
Medical Center Blvd.
Winston-Salem NC 27157-1040
E-mail: wfupc@wfubmc.edu

Web Site:http://www.wakehealth.edu/ccmr/

Principal Investigator and Contact
Jay R. Kaplan, Ph.D.
Phone: 336-716-1522; Fax: 336-716-1515
E-mail: jkaplan@wfubmc.edu

Additional Contact
Matthew J. Jorgensen, Ph.D.
Phone: 336-716-6935; Fax 336-716-1515
E-mail: mjorgens@wakehealth.edu

 

 

 


 

Alamogordo Primate Facility
Research Emphasis/Objectives

The Alamogordo Primate Facility (APF) houses chimpanzees that have been used in biomedical research, but no active, invasive research is conducted on the site.

Services Provided

The APF provides for the long-term care and husbandry of chimpanzees that have been used in biomedical research. Charles River Laboratories Inc. operates the facility under contract with the National Institutes of Health. To be used in continuing virological research, the animals must be transferred to active chimpanzee research settings.

Animals

All chimpanzees at the APF have been exposed to various microorganisms, such as hepatitis C virus and HIV. For this reason, they may be candidates for studies related to these diseases. The Office of Research Infrastructure Programs (ORIP) may remove infected animals from the APF to other accredited chimpanzee facilities for research purposes. Investigators interested in the chimpanzees at the APF should contact Dr. Harold Watson in ORIP's Division of Comparative Medicine to discuss research requirements. Dr. Watson can be reached at 301-435-0744.

Contact Information

Alamogordo Primate Facility
Holloman Air Force Base
Alamogordo, NM 88330

Contact
Harold Watson, Ph.D.
Phone: 301-435-0744; Fax: 301-480-3819
E-mail: watsonh@mail.nih.gov

 
 

 

 


 

University of Texas
Research Emphasis/Objectives

Research objectives are to provide physically and behaviorally healthy chimpanzees for critical biomedical research and testing; to conduct relevant research projects of benefit to chimpanzee health, productivity, and well-being.

Current Research

Develop and improve techniques of captive management; investigate behavioral factors influencing improvements in the husbandry and well-being of chimpanzees; support collaborative programs in genetic management.

Services Provided

A demographically balanced and behaviorally healthy group of chimpanzees to meet current and future research and testing needs in the United States. The colony is housed in eight 4,500-square-foot outdoor corrals in multiple-male family groups. Complete facilities and services are available for visiting scientists. Chimpanzees are available to investigators supported by NIH grants and contracts.

Biological Materials

Tissues and body fluids are available when coordinated with preventive health care procedures.

Contact Information

University of Texas
M. D. Anderson Cancer Center
Department of Veterinary Sciences
650 Cool Water Drive
Bastrop, TX 78602

Website: http://mdanderson.org

Contact
Christian R. Abee, D.V.M.
Phone: 512-321-3991; Fax: 512-332-5208
E-mail: cabee@mdanderson.org

Principal Investigator
Christian R. Abee, D.V.M.

 

 

 


 

NIH-Owned Chimpanzee Research Resource at the SNPRC
Research Emphasis/Objectives

This project, which is located at the Southwest National Primate Research Center (SNPRC) in San Antonio, Texas, supports NIH-owned chimpanzees and makes them available for qualified research.  The chimpanzees are available for NIH-funded research that has been approved by the NIH Chimpanzee Research Use Panel (CRUP) or is exempt from CRUP approval.

Services Provided

SNPRC staff who are highly skilled and experienced in all procedures that are commonly used in research with chimpanzees conduct the experimental procedures and sample collection for investigators.  Archived blood, tissue, and DNA samples are available to investigators through the SNPRC Biomaterials Program.

Contact Information

Texas Biomedical Research Institute
Southwest National Primate Research Center
P. O. Box 760549
San Antonio, TX 78245-0549
Website:  http://www.txbiomed.org/primate-research-center

Grant No.: U42 OD011184

Principal Investigator and Contact:
Robert E. Lanford, Ph.D.
Phone:  210-258-9445
Email:  rlanford@txbiomed.org

 

 

 


 

Chimpanzee Management Program
Description

The NIH Chimpanzee Management Program (ChiMP) supports long-term, cost-effective housing and maintenance at ORIP-supported facilities for chimpanzees. ORIP provides programmatic oversight of the facilities and ensures they comply with the Animal Welfare Act, and policies concerning laboratory animal care and use. READ MORE >>

Contact Information

Office of Research Infrastructure Programs
Division Program Coordination, Planning, and Strategic Initiatives
Office of the Director
National Institutes of Health
One Democracy Plaza
6701 Democracy Boulevard, MSC 4874
Bethesda, Maryland 20892-4874

Contact
Harold Watson, Ph.D.
301-435-0744; Fax: 301-480-3819
E-mail: WatsonH@mail.nih.gov

 

 

 


 

Caribbean Primate Research Center SPF Rhesus Monkey Program
Research Emphasis/Objectives

Research objective are: i) to establish, and maintain, a specific-pathogen-free (SPF) rhesus macaque supply and breeding colony program and ii) to enhance the existing specific-pathogen-free (SPF) rhesus macaque supply and breeding colony program at the SabanaSeca Field Station of the Caribbean Primate Research Center (CPRC). The CPRC program will make a significant contribution to advancing AIDS research by providing high-quality and healthy SPF rhesus monkeys to NIH-sponsored research programs. The CPRC program uses genetically characterized, MHC-typed, Indian-origin monkeys from the CPRC's free-ranging colony on the island of Cayo Santiago. Previous surveys have shown that the Cayo Santiago macaques are free of several important viruses, including retroviruses and simian virus 40 (SV-40), and that the majority of immature animals are negative for B-virus (Herpesvirussimiae or Cercopithecineherpesvirus type 1). About 20-25 percent of these monkeys are also Mamu-A*01 positive. Currently, there is a shortage of SPF rhesus monkeys for biomedical research, and the demand for these animals is expected to increase dramatically in the future. The establishment and maintenance of this program at the SabanaSeca Field Station will help meet the increased demand for both SPF (B-virus, SRV-D, SIV, STLV-1, and SV-40-free) and Mamu-A*01 positive rhesus monkeys. Forty-five SPF females and nine SPF males (nine breeding groups) will be added to the colony each year through internal recruitment from Cayo Santiago and the SabanaSeca Field Station. MHC-typing and selective breeding will be used to increase the production of SPF Mamu-A*01 positive offspring.

Current Research

The virology laboratory conducts research on recombinant DNA vaccines using rhesus macaques and performs viral tests for herpes B-virus, STLV, and SIV. The BL 2/3 Virology Laboratory has allowed CPRC to establish the SPF program under the sponsorship of ORIP, and one of its major objectives is to support ongoing SPF programs. The laboratory serves as a platform of research in vaccine development (SHIV, SIV, Dengue) and in genetics. This laboratory provides services to the conventional and SPF CPRC colonies (viral serology/PCR) .With the support of R01 and U01 NIH grants, this laboratory is collaborating with mainland investigators in vaccine and pathogenesis studies involving rhesus macaques.

Services Provided

CPRC welcomes collaborative research with established behavioral and biomedical investigators and encourages the use of its animal and osteological resources for dissertation research. Investigators are charged modest use fees for access to the animals, computerized database, and office space. All proposals receive rigorous peer review and are judged on scientific merit, feasibility, and potential overlap with ongoing studies. Protocols using live monkeys must be approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) of the home institution, as well as the University of Puerto Rico Medical Sciences Campus IACUC.

Contact Information

University of Puerto Rico
Medical Sciences Campus
P.O. Box 1053
Sabana Seca, PR 00952-1053

Websites: http://cprc.rcm.upr.edu/ ; http://cprc.rcm.upr.edu/?q=virologylab

Grant No.: U42 OD011128

Grant No.: U24 OD010421

Principal Investigator and Contact
Carlos A. Sariol, M.D.
Phone: 787-758-2525 ext. 5112 or ext. 1189; Fax: 787-767-1442
E-mail: carlos.sariol1@upr.edu

Mailing Address
Virology Laboratory
Office B-315
University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine
P.O. Box 365067
San Juan, PR 00936-5067

 

 

 


 

Establishment of a SPF Rhesus Macaque Colony in Texas
Research Emphasis/Objectives

This program, which is located at the Southwest National Primate Research Center (SNPRC) in San Antonio, Texas, produces Indian-origin rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) that are specific-pathogen-free (SPF) for herpes B virus, SIV, SRV, and STLV-1. The breeding colony produces high quality genetically characterized and MHC-typed animals for use in AIDS-related research conducted by NIH-supported grantees. Occasionally, monkeys are available for other types of research or to non-NIH funded investigators.

Services Provided

Monkeys are available for sale to investigators who want to use the monkeys in research at the SNPRC and those who want to transport the monkeys for research conducted at other sites.  ABSL-3 and ABSL-4 facilities are available at SNPRC and Texas Biomed for infectious disease research, including research with Select Agents.

Contact Information

Texas Biomedical Research Institute
Southwest National Primate Research Center
P. O. Box 760549
San Antonio, TX 78245-0549
Website:  http://www.txbiomed.org/primate-research-center

Grant No.: U42 OD 010442

Principal Investigator and Contact:
Robert E. Lanford, Ph.D.
Phone: 210-258-9445
Email:  rlanford@txbiomed.org

 

 

 


 

Expansion of a SPF Rhesus Colony in Louisiana
Research Emphasis/Objectives

The objective of this grant is development and maintenance of a specific-pathogen-free (SPF) rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) breeding colony. Animals derived from the colony are limited to use for AIDS research. Nonhuman primates derived from the colony are seronegative for simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), simian T -lymphotrophic virus (STLV-1), type D retrovirus (SRV), and Cercopithecineherpesvirus 1 (CHV1 or B-virus). The retroviruses (SIV, STLV-1 and SRV), when present in animals used for AIDS studies, may confound research data. B-virus is hazardous to humans and is being eliminated to protect personnel coming in contact with infected animals or their tissues.

Services Provided

SPF rhesus monkeys may be requested for AIDS research by contacting the principal investigator. The Tulane Resource Allocation Committee has responsibility for allocating animal resources to NIH-funded investigators. To apply for allocation of SPF rhesus monkeys, investigators must first complete an application form, which is available from the principal investigator.

Contact Information

Tulane National Primate Research Center
18703 Three Rivers Road
Covington, LA 70433

Grant No.: U24 OD011109

Principal Investigator
Rudolf P. Bohm, Jr., D.V.M.
Phone: 985-671-6266; Fax: 985-871-6388
E-mail: TNPRC-VetMed@tulane.edu

Additional Contact
James L. Blanchard, D.V.M., Ph.D.
Phone: 985-871-6285
E-mail: TNPRC-VetMed@tulane.edu

 

 

 


 

Production of Pedigreed SPF Rhesus Macaques in California
Research Emphasis/Objectives

The objective of this program is to produce pedigreed rhesus macaques of Indian origin that are free of selected viral pathogens. These agents include: Cercopithecine herpesvirus 1 (herpes B), simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), simian T-lymphotropic virus 1, type D retrovirus, and simian foamy virus (SFV). These animals are of known pedigrees confirmed by microsatellite testing and are also typed for Mamu-A*01 alleles by the UC Davis Veterinary Genetics Laboratory. Colony status is confirmed by frequent viral screening through the Simian Retroviral Core Laboratory.

Current Research

Research programs are in place to use assisted reproductive technology strategies to expand numbers of Mamu-A*01 positive animals and other genotypes that may be of specific research interest. The center is also identifying additional viral pathogens to be excluded from the specific-pathogen-free (SPF) population. Genetic studies are under way to determine whether A*01 positive individuals are heterozygous or homozygous.

Services Provided

Animals

Scientists wishing to use pedigreed Indian origin rhesus macaques should contact the principal investigator. Scientists wishing to conduct research at the California National Primate Research Center should contact the director. Information for research access to the primate center is available on the center's website

Other Services

Pedigree analysis and MHC typing for rhesus macaque is available through the UC Davis Veterinary Genetics Laboratory.

Contact Information

California National Primate Research Center
University of California, Davis
One Shields Avenue
Davis, CA 95616-8542

Website: www.cNPRC.ucdavis.edu

Grant No.: U42 OD010990

Principal Investigator and Contact
Dallas M. Hyde, D.V.M.
Phone: 530-752-6490; Fax: 530-752-2880
E-mail: DMHYDE@UCDAVIS.EDU

Website: www.cNPRC.ucdavis.edu

 

 

 


 

SPF Indian Rhesus Monkey Colony in Louisiana
Research Emphasis/Objectives

The center's objective is development of a specific-pathogen-free (SPF) rhesus monkey ( Macaca mulatta ) breeding colony. Animals derived from the colony are limited to use for AIDS research. Nonhuman primates derived from the colony are seronegative for simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), simian T-lymphotrophic virus (STLV-1), type D retrovirus (SRV), and Cercopithecine herpesvirus 1 (CHV1 or B-virus). The retroviruses (SIV, STLV-1, and SRV), when present in animals used for AIDS studies, may confound research data. B-virus is hazardous to humans and is being eliminated to protect personnel from coming in contact with infected animals or their tissues.

Services Provided

SPF rhesus monkeys may be requested for AIDS research by contacting the principal investigator. The Tulane Resource Allocation Committee has responsibility for allocating the animals to NIH-funded investigators. To apply for allocation of SPF rhesus monkeys must first complete an application form, which is available through the principal investigator.

Contact Information

Tulane National Primate Research Center
18703 Three Rivers Road
Covington, LA 70433

Grant No.: U42 OD010568

Principal Investigator
James L. Blanchard, D.V.M., Ph.D.
Phone: 985-871-6285
E-mail: TNPRC-VetMed@tulane.edu

Additional Contact
Rudolf P. Bohm, Jr., D.V.M.
Phone: 985-871-6266; Fax:985-871-6388
E-mail: TNPRC-VetMed@tulane.edu

 

 

 


 

Specific-Pathogen-Free Rhesus Monkeys in Oregon
Research Emphasis/Objectives

The ONPRC maintains a specific-pathogen-free (SPF) Indian-origin rhesus macaque breeding colony in support of AIDS-related biomedical research. The research objectives are to: maintain a breeding population sufficient to supply 100 NHPs for AIDS-related research annually; optimize the usefulness of this population for research by characterizing ancestry, parentage, and MHC type; and ensure the population remains SPF through state of the art surveillance technologies.

Current Research

The Center's SPF Indian-origin rhesus macaque breeding programs have target female breeder populations of 250 and 125 animals, respectively. All adults and juveniles are free of simian immunodeficiency virus, T-lymphotrophic virus 1, type D simian retroviruses, and Herpesvirussimiae. Frequent microbiologic monitoring is performed to ensure SPF status. Research objectives focus on maintaining pedigreed, genetically diverse female breeders and production of offspring with defined MHC class Ihaplotypes. Polymorphic microsatellite analyses are used to verify parentage, to select appropriate males, and to monitor genetic diversity in the colonies. The SPF definition is expanded in the U24-supported colony to include additional viral agents that are useful as models of opportunistic infections in AIDS research or as vectors for vaccine development such as cytomegalovirus, rhesus rhadinovirus, spumaretrovirus, and simian virus 40.

Services Provided

Animals

SPF juvenile Indian-origin rhesus macaques, are available for sale to NIH grantees and other qualifying investigators for AIDS-related research. Blood samples and other tissues and body fluids obtainable using routine, noninvasive clinical procedures are available to qualifying investigators with appropriate institutional approvals for research animal use. Cost estimates for collection, packaging, and shipping are available upon request. Allocation of animals produced under this cooperative agreement is determined by the ONPRC Animal UseCommittee in consultation with the NCRR program administrator to ensure equitable distribution.

Other Services

The Center's resources are available to collaborative NIH grantees with appropriate animal care and use (IACUC) approval and institutional contractual agreements. Resources include veterinary clinical services, biological safety level 3 laboratory and animal containment facilities, anatomic pathology, clinical pathology, microbiology, and flow cytometry. Further information is available from the Associate Director's office. Contact Charles Roberts, Ph.D., 503-690-5259, e-mail: robertsc@ohsu.edu

Contact Information

Oregon National Primate Research Center
Oregon Health Sciences University, West Campus
505 N.W. 185th Avenue
Beaverton, OR 97006-3499

Website: onprc.ohsu.edu

Grant No.: U24 OD010850

Principal Investigator and Contact
Michael K. Axthelm, D.V.M.
Phone: 503-690-5236; Fax: 503-690-5524
E-mail: axthelmm@ohsu.edu

Grant No: U42 OD010426

Principal Investigator and Contact
Kerry L. Taylor, D.V.M.
Fax: 503-614-3736
E-mail: tayloker@ohsu.edu

Grant No.: P51 OD011092

Head, Non-Human Primate Resources, Division of Animal Resources
Kirk Andrews, D.V.M.
Phone: 503-614-376; Fax: 503-614-3736
E-mail: andrekir@ohsu.edu

 

 

 


 

Washington M. nemestrina SPF Breeding Colony
Research Emphasis/Objectives

Nonhuman primate (NHP) species have proven to be invaluable resources for AIDS research in several fields, including vaccine development, therapeutic agent discovery, and pathogenesis. Well-defined models of AIDS currently exist in pigtailed macaques (M. nemestrina), utilizing a large number of primate lentiviruses and other infectious agents. SPF M. nemestrinaare an essential resource for the research community as it works to address these critical issues.

A critical need exists to increase the number of pigtailed macaques available to the national research community. The Center, works with partners both within and outside NIH, has embarked on a program to increase the size of it's M. nemestrina breeding colony over time, thereby increasing the supply of this resource to address important issues in research and medicine.

Current Research

Expand an M. nemestrina breeding colony free of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB); simian immunodeficiency virus; simian retrovirus, all subtypes; simian T-lymphoptrophic virus, and Cercopithecineherpesvirus 1 for application to AIDS-related NIH research projects.

Contact Information

Washington National Primate Research Center
University of Washington
Box 357330; Health Sciences Center, Room I-421
Seattle, WA 98195-7330

Website: http://www.wanprc.org/

Grant No.: U42 OD011123

Principal Investigator
Mike Mustari, Ph.D.
Phone: 206-543-1430; Fax: 206-616-1710
E-mail: mike.mustari@wanprc.org

 

 

 


 

Expansion of a SPF Rhesus Colony in Georgia
Research Emphasis/Objectives

The Yerkes Center objective is to establishspecific-pathogen-free (SPF) rhesus monkey (Macacamulatta) breeding colony at its Field Station facilities. AIDS research. The animals derived from the colony are seronegative for simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), simian T -lymphotrophic virus (STLV-1), type D retrovirus (SRV), and Cercopithecineherpesvirus 1 (CHV1 or B-virus). In addition, all animal are genetically characterized both in respect to pedigree information and selected MHC alleles. The nonhuman primates derived from this colony are available for AIDS-related studies by NIH grantees, and all of the above listed attributes are important for AIDS research.

Services Provided

SPF rhesus macaques may be requested for AIDS research by contacting the principal investigator. The Yerkes Resource Allocation Advisory Committee has responsibility for allocating animal resources to NIH-funded investigators. To apply for allocation of SPF rhesus monkeys, investigators must first complete an application form, which is available from the principal investigator.

Contact Information

Yerkes National Primate Research Center
Emory University
954 North Gatewood Road, NE
Atlanta, GA 30322

Grant No.: U24 OD011023

Principal Investigator
Mark Wilson, Ph.D.
Phone: 404-727-9710; Fax: 404-727-3756
E-mail: mwils02@emory.edu

Additional Contact
Maria Crane, D.V.M.
Phone: 404-727-8653
E-mail: mmcrane@emory.edu

 

 

 


 

Primate Embryo Gene Expression Resource
Research Emphasis/Objectives

PREGER is a resource designed to advance nonhuman primate reproductive biology, through rapid and cost-effective analysis of gene expression in non human primate oocytes, embryos, stem cells and follicle cells.

Current Research

The resource is being expanded to incorporate RNAseq and array mRNA expression data, protein expression data for mammalian gametes and embryos, reproductive toxicology data from rhesus monkey stem cells, and gene pathway and network data related to reproductive biology.

Services Provided

The resource can produce and distribute amplified cDNA libraries in solution, dot blot hybridization membranes for gene expression analysis, primer sequences, and available human or rhesus monkey cDNA probes. The resource also houses an online searchable gene expression database, and a website containing methods, contacts, bibliography, and other tools. Registered users also receive a periodic newsletter about relevant advances in primate embryology. Available services include expression array, RNAseq, and DNA methylation analysis. The resource also provides an annual summer course for training in Molecular Biology techniques for mammalian gametes and embryos.

Contact Information

Department of Animal Science
Reproductive and Developmental Sciences Program
Michigan State University
474 S. Shaw Lane
East Lansing, MI 48824

Website: www.preger.org ; www.pregercourse.org

Grant No.: R24 OD012221

Principal Investigator and Contact
Keith E. Latham, Ph.D.
Phone: 517-353-7750; Fax: 517-353-1699
E-mail: lathamk1@msu.edu

 

 

 


 

 

NIH Nonhuman Primate Reagent Resource
Research Emphasis/Objectives

The objective of the NIH Nonhuman Primate Reagent Resource is to facilitate the use of nonhuman primate models of disease by providing primate-specific antibody reagents for targeting cell subsets, cell receptors, soluble mediators and immunoglobulins of the most common primate species used in research.  This is accomplished by developing new reagents specific for nonhuman primate proteins or immunoglobulins and by optimizing existing reagents intended for in vitro diagnostics or for in vivo use in the nonhuman primate species.

Current Research

Current research explores methods for generating and engineering recombinant antibodies against nonhuman primate targets and expressing these antibodies at large scale.  The NIH Nonhuman Primate Reagent Resource also studies the comparative structure and function of immunoglobulins between various primate species.

Services Provided

The resource provides antibodies for in vivo administration and for in vitro diagnostics in nonhuman primates. A database of commercial reagents that cross react with 12 different nonhuman primate species is maintained on the website. The resource also provides nonhuman primate recombinant proteins, immunoglobulin reference reagents and cell lines.

Contact Information

MassBiologics
University of Massachusetts Medical School
460 Walk Hill Street
Boston, MA 02126

Website: http://www.NHPReagents.org

Principal Investigator
Keith A. Reimann, DVM
Phone: 617-474-3260; Fax: 617-474-4365
E-mail: keith.reimann@umassmed.edu

Additional Contact
Adam Buzby, MBA, Program Administrator
Phone: 617-474-3261; Fax: 617-474-4365
E-mail: adam.buzby@umassmed.edu

 

 

 


 

Primate Genomics at the University of Washington
Research Emphasis/Objectives

The Division of Nonhuman Primate Systems Biology at the Washington National Primate Research Center is developing the resources necessary to apply the technologies of functional genomics to nonhuman primate research. Central to this effort is the construction of reference transcriptomes for nonhuman primates and the improvement of nonhuman primate genome annotation using the latest deep sequencing technologies.

Current Research

The resources being developed are tested in the context of integrated model systems, with particular emphasis on SIV infection of the rhesus macaque. The goal is to develop and make available physical and informational genomic resources to foster hypothesis-driven research using nonhuman primates and to increase understanding of a primary model for AIDS research.

Services Provided

Whole-transcriptome deep-sequencing analysis  (RNA-seq) of a compendium of tissues and immune cell subsets from multiple nonhuman primate species, quantitative expression analysis of macaque complex immune genes, cDNA libraries or clones from a variety of macaque tissues, macaque EST database, macaque oligonucleotide microarray.

Contact Information

Division of Nonhuman Primate Systems Biology
Washington National Primate Research Center
University of Washington
Box 358070
Seattle, WA 98195-8070

Websites: http://viromics.washington.edu/ , http://www.wanprc.org/scientific-divisions/nhp-systems-biology/ ,  http://nhprtr.org/

Grant No.: R24 OD010445, R24 OD011172 and P51 OD010425

Principal Investigator
Michael G. Katze, Ph.D.
Phone: 206-732-6136; Fax: 206-732-6056
E-mail: honey@uw.edu

Additional Contact
Xinxia Peng, Ph.D.
Phone: 206-732-6001; Fax: 206-732-6056
E-mail: xinxiap@uw.edu

 

 

 


 

Resource for Nonhuman Primate Immune Reagents
Research Emphasis/Objectives

Research objectives include characterizing, cloning, and quality testing nonhuman primate cytokines and immune cell-associated molecules in vitro and in vivo. Derivation of cytokines with extended bioavailability. This resource provides nonhuman primate immune reagents, such as cytokines, chemokines, soluble receptors as well as cDNA and expression clones for a variety of primate immune molecules.

Current Research

Ongoing preparation of recombinant rhesus IL-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-10, IL-12, IL-15, and Ig fusion cytokines. Custom preparation of cytokine- and cell-associated molecule expression vectors. Testing of adjuvant effect of defined immune enhancers in nonhuman primates. Cloning of new cytokines, receptors, and signaling molecules (IL-17, 21, 23, IL-7Ra, IL-15Ra, TIM3, FoxP3, etc.).

Services Provided

Distribution of nonhuman primate cytokine/immune molecule cDNAs for analysis and expression. Custom preparation of cytokine- and cell-associated molecule expression vectors. Custom preparation of recombinant cytokines. Custom cloning of new molecules from nonhuman primates. Expertise in cytokine analysis.

Contact Information

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Emory University School of Medicine
1639 Pierce Drive, WMRB Room 2339
Atlanta, GA 30322

Website: pathology.emory.edu/Villinger/index.htm Exit Disclaimer

Principal Investigator
François Villinger, D.V.M., Ph.D.
Phone: 404-712-2838; Fax: 404-712-1771
E-mail: fvillin@emory.edu

Additional Contact
Chadi Filfili
Phone: 404-712-1767; Fax: 404-712-1771
E-mail: rnhpir@emory.edu

 

 

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