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National Institutes of Health - Division of Program Coordination, Planning, and Strategic Initiatives
Council of Councils

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Use of Chimpanzees in NIH-Supported Research

 

Background

In December 2010, the NIH commissioned a study by the IOM to assess whether chimpanzees are or will be necessary for biomedical and behavioral research. The IOM issued its findings, with a primary recommendation that the use of chimpanzees in research be guided by a set of principles and criteria. On December 15, 2011, the NIH announced its acceptance of the IOM recommendations with respect to the use of NIH-owned or -supported chimpanzees in research.

After accepting the IOM recommendations, the NIH charged the NIH Council of Councils with assembling a working group to propose advice on implementing the IOM recommendations and to consider the size and placement of the active and inactive populations of NIH-owned and -supported chimpanzees. On January 22, 2013, the Council of Councils accepted recommendations presented by its Working Group on the Use of Chimpanzees in NIH-Supported Research and provided these recommendations to the NIH. After seeking and considering public comments, the agency accepted a majority of the Council’s recommendations on June 26, 2013 (see 78 Fed. Reg. 39741 (July 2, 2013) for a summary of the comments and the agency’s decisions and rationale).

 

NIH Decision on the Use of Chimpanzees in Research 

 

Chimpanzee Research Use Panel

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